Space: 1999
Episode by Episode

"The Exiles"


From: David Acheson (dkach@hot44mail.com) Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 06:18:27 EDT Subj: Space1999: The Exiles

With the new metamorph character introduced, the runaway moon runs into its first adventure with Maya as a resident of the base. Thus begins our discussion of the second episode of year two, THE EXILES.

I will begin by saying that I didn't mind this episode so much as a kid but, upon recent viewing, in my adulthood I have to admit I was greatly disappointed by it. I will get to the reasons later.

First I believe the episode had potential. Its not a bad storyline - psychotic aliens cryogenically frozen and exiled for their crimes only to be reawakened years later by innocent passerbys. STAR TREK did it successfully with Khan and even 1999 did a variation of it in year one with Johnny Byrne's END OF ETERNITY. The only difference there was that Balor was immortal so was not frozen. Despite the lack of originality, THE EXILES still follows one of those concepts that can be done over and over successfully. If done correctly.

I have no qualms with the script writer who in this case is Donald James. The first of the newcomers to the 1999 world, Mr. James is no stranger to Gerry Anderson. He co-wrote JOURNEY TO THE FAR SIDE OF THE SUN with Gerry and Sylvia and contributed to the scripts for UFO. I actually enjoyed his other two stories he wrote for year two (JOURNEY TO WHERE and THE SEANCE SPECTRE) so I cannot blame my disappointment over this episode solely on him.

Same goes to veteran director Ray Austin, a frequent contributor to year one. However, he does not appear in peak form here. If I remember correctly, Ray Austin had difficulties with the Freiberger regime unlike other veteran Charles Chricton who managed to stay for most of the season.

So what are my problems? To start,shoddy and rushed production values and bad acting. On the former: I noticed on the last viewing how almost all of Cantar and Zova's lines were redubbed. Was something wrong with the microphone when the episode was filmed? There has been similar complaints by list members of this redubbing in the series but I have yet to find it on as large a scale as in this episode. Secondly, Peter Duncan and Stacy Dorning were just awful as our young exiled aliens. They were picked to fit in with Fred Freiberger's obsession with the younger crowd but I just could not find them very convincing. With some noticeable exceptions, I found the occasional lack of quality actors in the second year somewhat disturbing.

The youth issue could have been played out beautifully given the right producer and actors. Naive, married student revolutionaries caught up in a idealistic political struggle. Instead of a campus in the US, Asian or South America we have an alien world as the setting. A lot more could have been done but I believe this may have been too heavy for Freiberger's light hearted approach to the series. Looking at it from this approach I get a better understanding of Petter Ogland's cartoon comments.

Most embarrassing scene? The part at the beginning where Helena and Maya are in Helena's quarters and later play a trick on John Koenig by having Maya transform into Helena. Besides the awful "porno-type" music the comedy here was just plain silly. I have no problems with introducing humour into the characters. However, this somewhat long piece was in the show only to say the obvious "We are doing a comedy sequence". This was indicative of the problems caused by Freiberger's changes. I still believe his changes were meant well but they were usually executed poorly.

What did I like? Besides the basic storyline, I enjoyed the use of the research lab separated from the rest of the base. A wonderful and sensible concept which only begs the question: Why didn't they have this in year one? Bergman was pretty reckless by bringing the SPACE BRAIN meteor and the capsule from Ariel into his lab inside the base. Year two appeared to show the Alphans being more creative with new ideas and gadgets.

I also like the sequence where Koenig, Maya and Zova were getting ready for a space walk to retrieve the remaining exiles in lunar orbit. As he did with Balor, Koenig has a trick up his sleeve. He literally pushes Zova out of the Eagle and off into space. Very dramatic sequence done at the right time and shows that Koenig is still the boss and won't take crap from bad aliens. Not a philosophical moment indeed but one that makes you cheer just like you did when the Death Star blew up in STAR WARS.

Except for the comedy sequence above, the music by Derek Wadworth was better than in THE METAMORPH. Brian Johnson's effects also appear to be in fine form in this episode.

Overall, I believe this episode could have been a lot better and is one of the few episodes I would actually like to see be redone today. It had potential but was poorly executed given the constraints it had.

David Acheson


From: CPerrins1@aol4tag.com Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 07:27:32 EDT Subj: Re: Space1999: The Exiles

I truly enjoyed this episode very much. My favorite scene was in Helena's quarters, where Maya and her played the trick on John. It's nice to see the characters having a little fun. We've always seen these characters so serious at least this scene gives us a look into their private life.

Christina


From: Paul Dorion (pdorion@mediom4tag.qc.ca) Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 14:22:57 -0400 Subj: Re: Space1999: The Exiles

One of the main reasons I like this episode so much is the way Donald James structure the plot. The prologue (teaser) and the first three acts end with panache, and each time the cliffhanger is bigger the the previous one(s). Each scene propels the plot forward, with the possible exception of the two-Helena scene (although it helps generate more tension later when Zova threaten Koenig while disfiguring Helena's sculpture).

Most embarrassing scene? The part at the beginning where Helena and Maya are in Helena's quarters and later play a trick on John Koenig by having Maya transform into Helena. Besides the awful "porno-type" music the comedy here was just plain silly.

IMO, the "porno-type" label would more fit the music composed for the drunk-Taybor scene (in "The Taybor") that the one used in the scene in Exiles (although I have to agree that, of all the music composed by Wadsworth for Y2 (aboce 150 themes!), this "cut" is of a somewhat lesser quality).

In a technical point of view, I also like the editing very much. One marvelous scene occurs when Cantar and Zova attack Tony And Maya in the generator room. Maya leaping in the air while transforming to a panther is a must-see scene.

But my favorite scene for this episode is the Command Center scene in the prologue where the Alphans discover the cylinders, wonder what they are and realize they might be missiles. The flawless editing (note how the camera pans from one character to the next during this tense dialog) adds to the wonderful acting of Landau, Merton, Anholt (and others) and the mysterious though low-key music (probably my favorite theme - apart from the title theme) all contribute to create a mysterious, nail-biting, tense and suspenseful scene. *A lot* goes in that scene (initial discovery-hypothesis-initial analysis-initial reaction-further analysis-ultimate decision-action) which is a fitting tribute of the teamwork of the command center crew; the viewer is made aware that the members of the command center crew *are* professionals and that they work as a team during a crisis. Very very effective scene on how to deal with a unknown -- and potentially dangerous -- phenomena.

Except for the comedy sequence above, the music by Derek Wadworth was better than in THE METAMORPH.

I agree, IMO the best of the six soundtracks composed by Wadsworth.

Paul :D


From: jcg@vh4tag.net Date: Thu, 25 Jun 1998 17:27:51 -0400 Subj: Space1999: The Exiles

I've always thought Koenig's line "I want that thing as far from Command Center as possible" was a little odd. Is it all right if it blows up the rest of the base?

It is a sensible development that they have removed research areas in the caves...making me think the idea was a development after they left earth.

That looks like Paul's MM console in the cave, complete with the remote eagle control.

Very funny that Helena is taking a reading from the computer using an IBM punch card, when everywhere else on the base they use the video screens and readouts.

This is one for the scientific types out there, but I thought that being in orbit meant weightlessness...if they were being acted on by the moon's gravity, they would be pulled down...ah well, the needs of plot.

I was sitting here wondering why Cantor's lines are all dubbed. The only non "he must have been really awful" answer I could come up with is that they found in post production that some of his dialogue needed serious fixing, and the actor wasn't available, so they brought someone in and had to dub all of his lines so they sounded the same. Zova's lines are not dubbed. It's also possible he sounded too British for whomever's tastes.

Helena's any new births may or may not be an acknowledgement of Alpha Child.

It's interesting to hear the senior members arguing ethics vs their own survival.

Yes the double Helena scene was pushing the humor thing a bit too far. I liked Bain's different body language as Maya/Helena...but I notice they also dubbed her lines to give Maya/Helena a different sound (which of course is what I argued they should have done in the dueling Helenas scene in Another Time, Another Place.) But I did like how Koenig tricked Helena into reveling herself by ticking her off about the kissing. That to me was very real. Just last night I was talking to my lady and I was laughing about how I knew exactly what to say to get under her skin.

I like the year two women...they leap right into danger, like the extra who dove right into the fire to rescue her fellow Alphan.

May's panther change was excellent, but why does she let herself just get shot by Zova? (Oh damn, there goes that plot thing again.)

Koenig's tossing the guard out of the way before he shoots the access panel to the Power Room has always looked stupid. His exaggerated movements before he shoots is also bad since he doesn't know when they will shoot off the explosion to make it look like he just shot his laser.

Here is that quick shot of Helena screaming, and Cantor is laughing (not very convincingly) and then looks into the camera. Now did he make a foolish mistake, or was he directed to look into the camera?

Even though she was the "bad guy" and had it coming, I think it was a daring thing for them in 1976 to have the male hero of a tv show kill a woman, as Koenig did when he threw Zova out of the eagle. In earlier times they would have had Cantor go back to Alpha and have him killed (cause he is male) and have Zova age. Of course they couldn't have done that last part the same because they would have had the woman (in this case Helena) cowering in the corner, and the male (Tony) would have been the hero. Except they wouldn't have done that because again you don't kill a woman....and you don't have the man do it. In a way, this might have been an early example of freedom due to being syndicated, rather then being on a network.

And of course I like how Helena figures it out and stops Cantor.

Bain's delivery of the line "Who said there was an emergency?" when Helena returns is perfect.

Yes the tag scenes can reach annoying levels, but still I like Koenig realizing he just can't win against Helena in the friendly war of the sexes thing.

Gee, two episodes and Mathias hasn't been beaten up...no wonder he left the series.


From: LKJ1999@aol4tag.com Date: Thu, 25 Jun 1998 17:37:12 EDT Subj: Re: Space1999: The Exiles

Hey i like Mathias! To darned bad we did not see much of him in Y-2...

Chas P.


From: djlerda@juno4tag.com Date: Thu, 25 Jun 1998 20:35:50 EDT Subj: Re: Space1999: The Exiles

It is a sensible development that they have removed research areas in the caves...making me think the idea was a development after they left earth.

Especially since the Ariel satellite from "The Last Sunset" was brought straight to the technical section. Same with the crunched up Eagle in "Space Brain." If an isolation facility existed prior to Breakaway, there are two prime candidates for it.

Very funny that Helena is taking a reading from the computer using an IBM punch card, when everywhere else on the base they use the video screens and readouts.

Victor and Kano always did a good job reading paper tape output, so why not Helena. :-)

It's also possible he sounded too British for whomever's tastes.

Methinks this is the reason.

Helena's any new births may or may not be an acknowledgement of Alpha Child.

More likely, just sloppy writing. Probably the result of not having the same story consultant between seasons It's as if the events of the first year didn't even take place in Y2.

Even though she was the "bad guy" and had it coming, I think it was a daring thing for them in 1976 to have the male hero of a tv show kill a woman, as Koenig did when he threw Zova out of the eagle.

Yes, I too was surprised that Koenig just threw her out the door. No nice death by laser or anything like that.

And of course I like how Helena figures it out and stops Cantor.

I always found it a little contrived that they were wrapped in Saranwrap so Cantor could be killed off with a scratch. Kind of reminded me of when they found Woody Allen wrapped in aluminum foil in "Sleeper."

Gee, two episodes and Mathias hasn't been beaten up...no wonder he left the series.

I believe he left in a contract dispute. Anyone have the details?

David J Lerda


From: Mike Lynch (Mike-Lynch@big44foot.com) Date: Sat, 27 Jun 1998 13:38:20 -0500 Subj: Space1999: The Exiles (even more)

I rather enjoy this episode, and feel that it adds the promise of a strong second season to the series (even though that promise would be let down a few episodes later).

As Paul stated the opening sequence in the Command Center is excellent. The assessment and apprehension displayed by the core members is beautifully done. Not only do we see that everyone works as a team, and handles unknown situations in a professional manner, but we feel as if we are a part of the Command Center staff. The combination of camera work and dialogue fully immerse the audience in working in the Command Center. Granted, some of the dialogue is a bit dated (the "atomic stingers" comment for example), but we still buy it.

The rather controversial "double Helena" scene is rather fun, in my view, and I feel the only weak spot is Landau's acting - it seems forced. Otherwise, I like the playfulness of Maya and Helena and the scene further insinuates Maya's acceptance and integration into Alphan life and society.

I also felt that the entire treatment of the alien canister was very well handled and well written. Koenig didn't have is staff just rush out and grab one and bring it back. It was studied, analyzed, "flight" patterns were observed ("they're in clusters of two, three, and four"), and when they were brought back they were taken to an isolated research facility. Granted this IRF looked rather like the Bat Cave, but its presence was very believable, even down to it's layout. The remote arm on the Eagle, however, strikes me as a little odd. Season Two seams to constantly boast new elements on almost a per episode basis (the booster Eagle in THE METAMORPH, the grab-arm Eagle in THE EXCILES, the remote laser on the Eagle in THE AB CHRYSALIS, the re-entry glider in THE IMMUNITY SYNDROME, etc.) only to never utilize them again (with the exception of the booster Eagle). I hate to revert back to my previous BATMAN reference, but this is very much in the fashion of the 60's BATMAN series. New gadgets are constantly appearing that conveniently do exactly what is needed at the given moment, only to disappear forever once their purpose is complete. The design of the arm was well done, and didn't appear to be just thrown own, but I would have like to have seen this later, or at least heard a reference to it.

I'm not going to discuss into the gorilla-suit alien... (as if I really needed to?)

How did the Alphan life-support system play a key factor in transporting Cantor, Zova, Helena, and Tony to Golos? Wouldn't it have made more sense to have written this as one of the Nuclear Generating Facilities? Granted, this wouldn't have tied-in to Cantor's pleas to re-animate his comrades, but I'm sure a somewhat feasible reason could have been written into the script as to why the power needed to be modified. Perhaps something along the lines of: modifying the output potential of one, or all three, of the NGFs would then allow the necessary modifications to be made to the life-support system. Koenig's apprehension would have worked just as well had the threat been to the base's power supply.

As has already been agreed Maya's mid-air transformation is one of the best transformations of the series. I'm still a little confused as to why she didn't try to attack Zova as she reached for the stun gun (or at least tried to scare her some more to keep her away from it), but that's ok... it was still a really cool move. :)

No one should ever have let Barbara Bain moan or scream in this series... her screams as Zova disfigured the sculpture were believable and very disturbing... but what the hell was that noise she was making when Cantor was "adjusting" the life-support system? She did this in GUARDIAN OF PIRI as well... and it's just down right embarrassing. It sounds like some twisted variation of an orgasm. If I wasn't a die-hard fan of the series I would fast forward past this (in both episodes), but I feel some deeper duty not to.

In an earlier e-mail from Simon he said that he felt Tony's line "Lets not explode down there like a couple of rockets..." was poor dialogue. I don't agree at all, and rather find this to be an excellent moment in the show. Tony has a very tactical view of situations as the Chief of Security, and this line demonstrates that (just as the "atomic stinger" comment does). Tony is a man that can think on his feet, but can also take into account the consequences of certain actions: running down the hall and into the fray would not be wise if they wanted to catch Cantor and Zova off guard, or not raise any suspicion. Personally - I feel that this brief moment not only adds to the character of Tony Verdeschi, but adds to the episode.

Uhh... just a question: Mathias told Zova that the effects of the stun would wear off in an hour... so how long was Tony out after Cantor stunned him? That's one short hour.

The scene where Koenig stuns Cantor is very awkward. This is just a blatant act of violence by Koenig, and doesn't seem at all to be his character. Cautious? Yes. Apprehensive? Yes. Malicious? No. I understand the motives, but the actions don't match. Tony's exclamation, "Have you lost your mind!" seems to fit what I feel whenever I watch this episode. Koenig, though he is generally a very level-headed man, can act irrationally at times when under stress or the influence of a given situation (such as his initial desire to remain with Vana in THE MISSING LINK). Even when he is though to be "hot headed" he has never lashed out like he did at Cantor. Cantor's "waking up" in Medical revealing that he had just pretended to be stunned was very creepy, and added the perfect balance (and twist) to Koenig's bizarre actions. So even though I find this scene disturbing Cantor's part makes it all worth while.

Lastly: I think Maya and Tony's little exchange at the end of the episode is very refreshing, and adds the needed levity to the show following the harrowing events that have transpired. "I'd rather be known as a man of good taste," is a great little poke at Maya, and I particularly enjoy Sandra's watching over Tony's shoulder.

Mike


From: Simon Morris (simes01@global44net.co.uk) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 15:21:33 +0100 Subj: Re: Space1999: The Exiles (even more)

In an earlier e-mail from Simon he said that he felt Tony's line "Lets not explode down there like a couple of rockets..." was poor dialogue. I don't agree at all, and rather find this to be an excellent moment in the show.

Tony has a very tactical view of situations as the Chief of Security, and this line demonstrates that (just as the "atomic stinger" comment does). Tony is a man that can think on his feet, but can also take into account the consequences of certain actions: running down the hall and into the fray would not be wise if they wanted to catch Cantor and Zova off guard, or not raise any suspicion. Personally - I feel that this brief moment not only adds to the character of Tony Verdeschi, but adds to the episode.

Yes. Having thought about it Mike you are right on this point. Although some people did not care for the character of Tony Verdeschi.I thought he was an improvement on the way Paul Morrow was presented in Y1 (and by that I do not mean the acting of Prentis Hancock,which was excellent when he was given a chance to shine;I mean the way the character was written,very little characterisation ever given etc). I'm still not sure that the actual dialogue in this scene was very good though to illustrate that side of Verdeschi!

I'd rather be known as a man of good taste," is a great little poke at Maya, and I particularly enjoy Sandra's watching over Tony's shoulder.

The first bit of the epilogue(and the line you quoted above)was a genuinely amusing and witty exchange as you say. The remaining bit with Koenig and Helena("Make me a pretty nose" etc) made me cringe though. Incidentally,if you watch this sequence very carefully you will notice the way the whole shot is framed. As Verdeschi turns round to look at Sandra,debating whether to respond to her challenge to kiss Maya,you can see a tiny movement behind him,(a flash of hair I think) where Catherine Schell is sneaking out of her position so that the "old hag" is now sitting there. Look carefully behind Verdeschi and you'll see what I mean.

Simon Morris


From: "Ellen C. Lindow" (sfdxb@scfn.thpl.lib.fl4tag.us) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 08:33:28 -0400 (EDT) Subj: Space1999: Metamorph/Exiles

Hi guys, I'm mostly back from vacation and am catching up on the y2 discussion. We watched Metamorph and Exiles last night. I thought Metamorph was a pretty good introduction to the Y2 changes. To me, the lack of any mention of missing Y1 cast members just gives more possibilities. If they've never said Victor is dead, he doesn't have to be. That way when I write fan fiction, I can play it either way. Same with Kano and Morrow. Usually, I prefer to believe that they were transferred to other places on the base and are busy doing other things.

I like the new costumes. All that beige drove me nuts. John is pretty much the same. He plays everything close to the vest, not even letting his key staff in on major directives, or quick decisions. Although directive 4 had been worked out in advance with Tony, his "deal" with Mentor was not unlike the sequence in the Last Enemy when he turns a laser on Main Mission and asks Dione for sanctuary, or Black Sun when he quietly has a team ready the survival Eagle without telling his senior staff. He appears to think several moves ahead of his opponent like a good chess player should, and the other Alphans never see it coming.

Helena's character has changed a good deal. She seems more ready to let her emotions show in places where she would have held them in check before. There's a new tension between her and Koenig, and I don't know if that was something coming from the actors' personal lives, or done consciously. As professional as Landau and Bain have always been, I really have a hard time believing that they allowed personal problems to interfere with a role they were playing. In Y1 the two seemed so comfortable together in subtle little ways: her smile when she sees him above her as she wakes in Zantor's stasis chamber, the way he protects her during the explosions in War Games, sharing a coffee cup on the way to Arkadia. In Y2, the physical attraction is still there, but she tends to pull away from him during moments that should be more intimate than anything we saw in Y1. I'm not talking about the kiss scene with Maya as her double (I kinda liked that scene. If you had a friend that could metamorph into your exact double, it would be too tempting to resist.) But at the end of the Exiles he goes running down the corridor to welcome her back, then stops when he sees her, and they start joking with each other. Sure, it was a tension breaker, but a hug would have been better. Just about the same thing happens in this week's episode when John talks Zamara into taking him and Maya to the planet. (Oh, David, I expect that John would have said anything necessary to get Maya down to the planet with him too, I believe he would have told Zamara that Maya was the love of whoever was down there, Tony, Alan, Sandra-- well, maybe not Sandra, not in 1976) When they get to the planet, John holds her at arms length. Perhaps Landau and Bain were given conflicting directions along the lines of "we want to heat up the attraction between Koenig and Russell, but not too much, don't overdo it." So the little touches stopped, and the more obvious affection was evident, but stopped short of feeling like true affection.

One scene in Exiles has always bothered me, and that's where John is talking about not allowing the exiles a home on Alpha. Well, he was right to do so since this little group of sociopaths is about the worst we've scene since Jarak, but he didn't know that at the time. John says that their life support system can't handle it, then referrs them to Dr. Russell who parrots the same information, looking uncomfortable. You almost get the feeling that Koenig wants to hear Russell say it because it's an old argument and he's trying to reinforce his position. I'm still of the opinion that in the long view, new births are imperative. They should be doing everything in their power to expand. If they don't they're all going to die. And I expect that would be Russell's position, but she isn't going to start the argument again with "outsiders" around.

OK, that's my 2 cents worth. I'll watch "Humanity this week. E


From: djlerda@juno4tag.com Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 13:49:10 EDT Subj: Re: Space1999: Metamorph/Exiles

Perhaps Landau and Bain were given conflicting directions along the lines of "we want to heat up the attraction between Koenig and Russell, but not too much, don't overdo it." So the little touches stopped, and the more obvious affection was evident, but stopped short of feeling like true affection.

Interesting that you mention this. One of the major criticisms of Y1 was that Landau and Bain's characters are supposed to be in love with one another but treat each other like cold fish. And yet, there are the subtleties that you mentioned. I never really thought about the coffee cup thing in Arkadia until you brought it up in an earlier email. As for new births - I was watching "Devil's Planet" the other night (don't ask me why - I was bored to tears, I guess) and during the sequence where Koenig's mind is being scanned, the interrogator states that Alpha's population is 298. If I recall, at the opening of "The Metamorph", Helena says the population is 297. So somewhere in the gap between the episodes, there was one birth. Or am I reading too much into this?

David J Lerda


From: Robert Gilbert (bcpgd@shaw.wave4tag.ca) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 12:17:55 -0600 Subj: [none or unknown]

To me, the lack of any mention of missing Y1 cast members just gives more possibilities. If they've never said Victor is dead, he doesn't have to be.

Yeah, maybe he is just laid up with a broken hip, neck, whatnot (I seemto remember something about him "Lying, spine broken" from one of the novels)? Maybe he got Alzheimers Disease? Maybe he was like Captain Pike (from Star Trek) except the Alphans were unable to build him a wheelchair with light which was mind controlled (which brings up another point, Captain Pike could still operate a Speech Synthesizer using what is called "Scanning" --- He would have a switch (the same "mind control" switch which was used on Star Trek) and it could be attached to a Device (such as a Light Talker (TM)). The way this Device operates is rather complicated but simple: there is a set of lights which correspond to letters. These lights flash in sequence and when the corresponding light lights to the letter he wants --- he presses the switch! I believe Gene Roddenberry Screwed up on the whole "Captain Pike" scenario!

I like the new costumes. All that beige drove me nuts.

Yes, but how could they: make new Costumes, Build a new Command Centre,and stick STOOPID labels on everything (such as the forementioned "WEAPONS RACK")?

I, too, believe Russell has grown from Y1! I also thought the Heckina Clonesscene was corny but believable! Of course, in the 70's --- this kinda behavior was common, but now it seems out of place (passe)!


From: "Nimoy Pugh" (npugh@ro4tag.com) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 14:56:33 -0500 Subj: Re: Space1999: Metamorph/Exiles

As for new births - I was watching "Devil's Planet" the other night (don't ask me why - I was bored to tears, I guess) and during the sequence where Koenig's mind is being scanned, the interrogator states that Alpha's population is 298. If I recall, at the opening of "The Metamorph", Helena says the population is 297. So somewhere in the gap between the episodes, there was one birth.

Maya....

However don't ask about the various extras that got toasted along the way.


From: "Ellen C. Lindow" (sfdxb@scfn.thpl4tag.lib.fl.us) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 16:00:00 -0400 (EDT) Subj: Re: Space1999: Metamorph/Exiles

David Lerda wrote:

during the sequence where Koenig's mind is being scanned, the interrogator states that Alpha's population is 298. If I recall, at the opening of "The Metamorph", Helena says the population is 297. So somewhere in the gap between the episodes, there was one birth.

Well, when I first read this I thought, that would be right. It wasn't a birth, it was an arrival: Maya. But... they also lost 2 people so they were really down to 296 at the end of the metamorph episode. That means a gain of 2 by the time of Devil's Planet. Beats me!


From: Mike Lynch (Mike-Lynch@big44foot.com) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 16:32:03 -0500 Subj: Re: Space1999: Metamorph/Exiles

Ellen C. Lindow wrote:

John is pretty much the same. He plays everything close to the vest, not even letting his key staff in on major directives, or quick decisions. Although directive 4 had been worked out in advance with Tony, his "deal" with Mentor was not unlike the sequence in the Last Enemy when he turns a laser on Main Mission and asks Dione for sanctuary, or Black Sun when he quietly has a team ready the survival Eagle without telling his senior staff. He appears to think several moves ahead of his opponent like a good chess player should, and the other Alphans never see it coming.

I really like this analysis of John, and even thought I've noticed this quality in him before I've never likened it to a chess player... but you're right - it's exactly like a good chess player. Which leads me to ask: Could it be that this is why John was one of Kano's chess partners (as we see in DRAGON'S DOMAIN)? Not to mention that it would seem that chess would be the natural outlet for someone who has such a strategic/tactical view of situations - it would keep them "fresh" and always thinking.

...Makes you kind of wonder why Tony brewed beer, since his position would call for a very similar style of thinking.

Mike


From: "Ellen C. Lindow" (sfdxb@scfn4tag.thpl.lib.fl.us) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 17:48:21 -0400 (EDT) Subj: Space1999: Beer vs. Chess

Well, I think it's pretty obvious that tony was much more a beer person than a chess person. With apologies to all the Tony fans out there, my opinion is that he was nicely decorative, but not particularly useful.

How about that scene in the Exiles where Helena ruptures Cantor's protective membrane then bounces around the room drawing his fire and taunting him while Tony hides under the table! Some security chief.

Then again, I expect this is exactly the kind of guy John would want for backup. A solid, follow orders sort of guy without a lot of imagination. John was never much one for explanations and with Tony you really wouldn't need to be. Kind of like a rook in a chess game. Always there, rather predictable, but ready to act when needed.

And in case anyone is wondering, Helena would obviously be queen, Alan and Paul knights, Victor and Maya bishops, Sandra the other rook, and any slob without a contract were the pawns. (Anyone interested in chess and computers in science fiction should read the book Wyrm by Mark Fabi. It's one of the best books I've read in a long long time. It also touches on the Y2K problem, armageddon and the existance of God. I _highly_ recommend it.)


From: Patricia Embury (Patriemb@sprint44mail.com) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 18:36:48 -0400 Subj: Re: Space1999: Beer vs. Chess

How about that scene in the Exiles where Helena ruptures Cantor's protective membrane then bounces around the room drawing his fire and taunting him while Tony hides under the table! Some security chief.

Cantor had stunned Tony. He was unconcious, not hiding.

Then again, I expect this is exactly the kind of guy John would want for backup. A solid, follow orders sort of guy without a lot of imagination. John was never much one for explanations and with Tony you really wouldn't need to be. Kind of like a rook in a chess game. Always there, rather predictable, but ready to act when needed.

I think Tony is a beer person, but I disagree with some reasons. He is more down to earth, a guy to get his hands dirty. However, he wasn't always predictable. In the "double Koenig" episode, he questions Koenig, and turns against Koenig. Carter, who is more of a solid, be there when they need you type, stays steadfastly loyal to Koenig, until it is obvious that Koenig is not who he appears to be.


From: Mike Lynch (Mike-Lynch@big44foot.com) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 21:42:51 -0500 Subj: Re: Space1999: Beer vs. Chess

Hmmm... interesting view of Tony. And after reading your thoughts on this I've started to re-think my question as to why Tony would prefer beer to chess.

As Patricia stated Tony is a "down to Earth" man, and he strikes me as the type of person that would feel the need to step back from his daily routine and immerse himself in a personal interest that was completely removed from his duties. What better way than to perfect a contraband substance? Well, obviously alcohol isn't viewed as being so taboo in the second season since everyone knows that Tony brews beer... or at least attempts to. The bottle of brandy that was broken out in BLACK SUN had been stashed (wasn't it?), and if memory serves there was a reference to the need to hide the bottle in the novelization of the same story in the book BREAKAWAY (or am I confusing that with the stun gun that Koenig had hidden in his office in teh book COLLISION COURSE?). Anyway... Tony's choice to brew beer as opposed to taking on challenging games of strategy and tactical prowess probably just stems from his need to get away. Everyone has their own means of relaxing, and brewing happens to be Tony's.

Now if we wanted to look a little deeper into Tony's choice of brewing beer we might see that his seemingly eternal battle to perfect his creation is just an extension of his need solve problems. Now, this is something that is shared by John, as well, but to a greater degree. Tony's need, though usually in direct response with the benefit of Alpha as a whole, or the safety of an individual, seem to take on a more personal aspect. Where John seems to act for the base, Tony acts for a more personal satisfaction. This is not to say that he is self-centered or egotistical, but rather he carries a belief of personal responsibility for that which goes on around him and affects the lives of others. THE MARK OF ARCHANON is coming to mind at the moment - probably because I just watched this a couple of nights ago. Tony was not only very obviously in charge of base operations in Koenig's absence, but seemed to have his hands in everything that was going on: communicating with John and Maya; figuring out how to operate the alien recorder/transmitter; working with Maura (albeit briefly); negotiating with Pasc; checking with Medical; working with Etrec through Carter; he even rushed in amidst the collapsing ceiling in the catacombs to try and figure out how to open the stasis chamber. Granted, many of these fall under the general duties of the base commander, but I think this last example coupled with his working in Tech lab 3 with Carter and Johnson (presumably he had been working alone with Johnson when he requested that Johnson go find Carter) in trying to figure out the recorder/transmitter are excellent displays of his personal need to solve problems. Tony didn't need to be in Tech Lab 3, there were obviously other issues that could have seen his attention, yet he chose the task of understanding alien technology. This decision probably stemmed from his experience in the catacombs in which he stated that if Maya had been there she would have been able to figure out the device in no time. Realizing that he was faced with a challenge he felt the need to see it through. We also can't overlook the fact that Tony held much of Pasc's claims to suspicion, and this too would have added to his need to understand the alien power generator (/recorder/transmitter).

...So, in a sense Tony's brewing is equal to Kano's or John's desire to play chess on their time off.

Needless to say Tony is one of my favorite characters (next to Alan).

And regarding the EXILES - Tony had been stunned by Cantor... hence his absence while Helena was "battling" Cantor.

Wow... your comments really opened up a flood gate, didn't they. Thanks.

Mike


From: Mike Lynch (Mike-Lynch@big44foot.com) Date: Wed, 01 Jul 1998 17:00:36 -0500 Subj: Space1999: Back to the Exiles for a moment...

I realize we're on to ONE MOMENT OF HUMANITY, and I apologize for jumping back a week, but I just wanted to add this:

I was watching THE EXILES last night, and I paid particular attention to the music played during the "duel Helena" scene since I never really gave it much thought. The term "porno disco" just doesn't strike me as appropriate. As a matter of fact, even after paying attention to it I wasn't thrilled or displeased with it - I see it as being just filler... rather like the goo that fills Freshen Up gum: it doesn't exactly add to it, but nor does it take away from the experience.

The music in this scene is very indicative of the type music that was in a great many shows that aired between 1975 and 1977. It actually reminds me of the type of music played at a light-hearted moment in "CHiPs." Yes, it's cheesy by today's standards, but at the time it was rather common.

Anyway, that's just my .02

Mike


From: jcg@vh4tag.net Date: Wed, 01 Jul 1998 19:08:01 -0400 Subj: Re: Space1999: Back to the Exiles for a moment...

Yes, I think the Alternate Theme Two on the year two cd is so 70's...a cross of SWAT, Charlie's Angels and every other show coming out of the Aaron Spelling factory at that time.


Related Threads (in typical Thread Pages format):

Related Pages (elsewhere here at Metaforms): Related Links (external, not affiliated w/Metaforms):

Next Chapter: "One Moment of Humanity"


Return to Episode by Episode
or to Space: 1999 Metaforms